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Folic Acid
Folic Acid

Folic Acid

B-Vitamin required for the synthesis of RNA, DNA

What Is Folic Acid?

Folic acid derives its name from the latin word folium, which means leaf, which is where folate is found in abundance. It is a water-soluble B vitamin, with three distinct parts: Pterin, PABA, and Glutamic Acid. It is sometimes referred to as Vitamin B9, but more commonly known as ‘folic acid’. Folic acid plays essential roles in the growth of neonates, and it is critical in the prevention of ‘neural tube defects’ (NTDs). Numerous studies indicate that the combination of food and supplementary folate has greatly prevented NTDs.

Folic acid is also important in cardiovascular health and blood glucose metabolism. The mechanism of activity of this nutrient is through its ability to carry and transfer methyl (CH3) groups, known as methylation. Folic acid is capable of reducing homocysteine, which is a biomarker found elevated in coronary artery disease and also associated with cerebral or peripheral vascular dysfunction. View research

Why Folic Acid?

Folic acid and cardiovascular health

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Folic acid and cardiovascular health

Homocysteine is an amino acid that has been associated with arterial hardening and thickening, and high circulating blood levels can double or triple the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. In 2017, a clinical trial was conducted with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients with elevated levels of homocysteine. The 25 study participants were given 800 mcg of folic acid (400 micrograms twice daily) over an 8 week period and then assessed for cardiovascular lipid biomarkers as well vascular function and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. The group that was given folic acid showed a significant 7.5% reduction in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and improvement in ratios of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C/HDL-C) and total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C).

In addition, the folic acid treated group demonstrated a 16.2% increase in blood B12 levels. The scientists mentioned that elevated homocysteine traps B12 in the form of methylcobalamin, and that folic acid supplementation elevates remethylation of homocysteine thereby freeing B12 for other functions. It can be seen that folic acid not only affects circulating homocysteine, but can also positively impact blood lipids and B12 efficiency.

Sources of Folic Acid

Good sources of folic acid green include liver, mushrooms, and dark green vegetables (spinach, broccoli, brussel sprouts, asparagus), cereals and rice. Setu Folic Acid is bioidentical to the form utilized in the body, and its purity is made to exacting USP/EP grade standards.