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Alpha Lipoic Acid
Alpha Lipoic Acid

Alpha Lipoic Acid

Master antioxidant to help in cellular regeneration.

What is Alpha Lipoic Acid?

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring nutrient synthesized in the body and is highly involved in energy metabolism. ALA is a potent anti-oxidant compound that works with the mitochondria (cellular organelle responsible for the synthesis of energy) and the body’s natural anti-oxidant defenses. Other antioxidants work only in water (such as vitamin C) or fatty tissues (such as vitamin E). But Alpha Lipoic Acid is both fat and water soluble. That means it can work throughout the body. It is capable of exerting effects on glucose uptake, insulin metabolic pathways, liver protection, and gastric protection from effects of alcohol. ALA is also seen as an anti-aging compound since it can reverse some of the oxidant damage related to the effects of aging.

Why is Alpha Lipoic Acid good for you

The master antioxidant Alpha Lipoic Acid is made inside the body and found in plant foods like spinach and broccoli. It is made commercially through a process of synthesis, partially through fermentation starting materials.

Why is ALA good for diabetes

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Why is ALA good for diabetes

According to a study, the antioxidant Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) improved the body’s ability to reduce blood sugar (measured by HgA1c) and blood fats in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Researchers tested the study on 105 patients for a period of 3 months, The patients were given 600mg of ALA per day. At the end of the study period, scientists found that subjects taking AlphaLipoic Acid had a reduction in Hemoglobin A1C (HgbA1C) as well as reduction in triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol. View research

Helps Neuropathy

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Helps Neuropathy

Nerve fiber degeneration is a pathophysiological effect of diabetes. Its prevalence is high, with scientists estimating that 50% of diabetics will develop diabetic peripheral neuropathy, resulting in pain, prickling, burning, itching, tingling, and numbness in arms and legs from nerve damage. An extensive review of randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trials and meta-analyses, indicate that ALA is efficacious and safe for diabetic neuropathy. In particular, ALA may be beneficial in subjects with early neuropathic deficits and symptoms. ALA has been demonstrated to improve sensory deficit, muscle strength, numbness, in addition to neuropathic pain. View research

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Great for your liver

ALA recharges and regenerates other liver-protective antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, glutathione and CoQ10 . In addition, it binds to and detoxifies heavy metals such as mercury and lead. In experimental trials, it has been demonstrated that consumption of fructose leads to oxidative stress in the liver. The liver is the only organ that can metabolize fructose in significant amounts. A recent study, demonstrated that fructose-fed rats given ALA were significantly protected from the harm of high fructose, specifically in the liver by (a) improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, (b) increased antioxidant capacity and decreased liver oxidative stress and © enhanced liver antioxidant enzymes expression . Lipoic acid prevents metabolic changes in the liver induced by administration of a fructose-rich diet. View research

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Releases Oxidative Stress

Elevated blood glucose induces a state of high oxidative stress. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on markers of oxidative stress. The six month study evaluated different levels of Alpha Lipoic Acid supplementation on thirty eight type 2 diabetics. The ALA-treated group did not exhibit an increase in urinary PGF2α-Isoprostanes (F2α-IsoP), indicating suppressive activity of ALA on lipid peroxidation. In addition, fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were reduced in the ALA-treated group. View research

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Dietary sources of ALA

Typical dietary sources of ALA are muscle meats, heart, kidney, and liver, and to a lesser degree, fruits and vegetables . Though available from these normal nutritional sources, it is not likely that appreciable amounts of ALA are consumed in the typical Western diet; rather, dietary supplements are the primary sources of ALA, and most information as to its bioavailability comes from studies using supplements. In supplement form, it has shown protection from various forms of oxidation and inflammation. These effects protect against heart diseases, liver diseases, diabetes, and neurological decline associated with aging. Take one of Setu’s Liver or Diabetes supplements every day with food, and enjoy the full benefits of this master antioxidant.

How do we source it

The master antioxidant Alpha Lipoic Acid is made inside the body and found in plant foods like spinach and broccoli. It is made commercially through a process of synthesis, partially through fermentation starting materials.